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Talking about estate planning can be a delicate subject

Sometimes people don't like to talk about estate planning. It can be unpleasant to discuss not being around for your family and friends. While many people will live long, productive lives, it is never too late to start working on an estate plan. Estate planning can help those who are near the end of their lives gain peace of mind that their wishes will be honored, but it can also help people who are seemingly healthy plan for the unexpected.

Estate planning can come with some odd questions, but they are necessary to make sure all proper documents are worded correctly to ensure a person's wishes are fulfilled with their estate. No matter the size of a person's estate, it is important to have a plan in place so loved ones can make sure your wishes are followed.

The questions that an experienced estate planning attorney might ask a person are meant to get to know that person and also help the attorney avoid any possible challenges to a person's plan after they pass away. Some of the things an attorney might ask about are:

•· Children that weren't known to others in the family

•· Digital information

•· Agreements you have signed

•· Health Issues

•· Whether you have frozen genetic material

While some of these issues might seem odd, they can be essential to avoiding complications to an estate plan. With changing family situations and technological advances that might affect a person, it is important to have everything out in the open with an attorney.

Source: Forbes, "12 Estate Planning Questions That Might Make You Squirm," Deborah L. Jacobs

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